Open Licenses

Most of the open licenses are very similar on their faces, they have small differences throughout the fine print.

GNU

Historical Significance

  1. Created by Richard Stallman for the GNU Project
  2. Used on 65% of free software projects in 2007

Key Points

  1. Free, copyleft license for software + other things
  2. To preserve, not take away your freedom
    1. the right to distribute software, even at a cost
    2. The right to receive the source code and make changes
  3. Rules
    1. Need to respect the freedom of otehrs by informing them they can access the source code.
    2. assert copyright and then offer people the GNU license
  4. Another version of the GPL called the AGPL. You have to distribute source code, even if you don’t distribute the software as in the case of a webapps (e.g. facebook).

Questions for Discussion

  1. What is the situation with devices that don’t let users run modified version in the 3rd to last paragraph?
  2. How could a patent be applied to software?

Supplemental Resources

Other

  1. It’s interesting that GPL licensed  software can be used to create proprietary software. Is this for practical reasons?
  2. Microsoft seems to claim that GPL has some viral properties, does non-free software not have these same properties?
  3. How can stallman justify selling license exceptions to companies? Aren’t they evil?

BSD

Historical Significance

Key Points

  1. free software license, with minimal restrictions on redistribution
    1. does not have share-alike requirements like copyleft.
  2. Allows proprietary use and allows incorporation into proprietary products.

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

Other

MIT

Historical Significance

Key Points

  1. permits reuse within proprietary software as long as copies of the licensed software include a copy of the MIT license terms and copyright notice
  2. propriety software stays proprietary
  3. explicitly states the rights of the user

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

Other

Apache

Historical Significance

Key Points

  1. Doesn’t require derivative work to be distributed using the same licenses.
  2. Does require that all unmodified parts must have their original license.
  3. Whenever code is changed a notice must be included. This notice cannot modify the license.

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

  1. Comparison of free and open-source software licenses

Other

Creative Commons

Historical Significance

  1. Forge a balance within the status quo of copyright law.
    1. provide everyone with a simple way to grand copyright permissions to their work

Key Points

  1. Licensors can retain copyright while sharing their work.
    1. Allows them to get credit.
  2. Answer questions
    1. Does the licensor want to allow commercial use?
    2. Does the licensor want derivatives to be shared alike?
  3. Layers
    1. Legal code – traditional
    2. Human readable – commons deed. summarizes and expresses the most important information.
    3. Machine readable – allows searching for content based on the license.
  4. Licenses
    1. CC BY = Attribution
    2. CC BY-SA = Attribution-ShareAlike
    3. CC BY-ND = Attribution -NoDerivs
    4. CC BY-NC = NonComercial
    5. CC BY-NC-SA = NonCommerical-ShareAlike
    6. CC BY-NC-ND = NonCommercial-NoDerivs
  5. One of the Purposes is the reduce friction
    1. It can be difficult to track down copyright holders to get permission even if they want to give it
    2. There is just the one, the historical licenses (e.g. open content), encourage you not to use them anymore.
    3. There will never be another license to avoid license proliferation

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

Other

GFDL

Historical Significance

  1. Developed for software manuals, but not limited to them. Suggested for instruction and reference materials.

Key Points

  1. The purpose is to make a document free (liberated)
    1. allows the author to get credit, without being responsible for modifications by others
    2. Derivative works needs to be shared alike
  2. If there are more than 100 copies distributed than the original must be made available as well (as in two books?)
  3. Used by Wikipedia (+ CC BY-SA) – not compatible without a modified authorship clause.
  4. Some find it unfree because it allows invariant text which can’t be modified or removed, which doesn’t allow people to change it however they want.
  5. Less than reasonable for short printed text – you have to include a hard copy of the license with every printed copy of something licensed with it.

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

Other

Open Publication License

Historical Significance

Key Points

  1. Severability – if part of it is unenforceable somewhere, the rest of is is still in force
  2. No warranty
  3. Modifications must be labeled, with acknowledgement to past and present authors and must provided reference to the original.
  4. Allows for a prohibition of substantively modified versions
  5. Can combine with other, less restrictive licenses.

Questions for Discussion

Supplemental Resources

Other

Advertisements
This entry was posted in OER. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s