Downes on Kirschner, Sweller, Clark (2006)

Sitzman & Hildebrand: Minimally guided instruction wastes cognitive resources because on top of the energy it takes to learn the material learners must also divide the useful from the fluff.

Does making and disregarding connections on one’s own hinder or enhance learning?


KDeRosa: “Students will remember incorrect “discoveries” just as well as correct ones.”

Is this making mistakes only detrimental? Is there a way to avoid it?


Schwartz: Long-term memory is the “central and dominant structure of human cognition”. She compares the two, suggesting that “discovery learning” separates learning from long term memory. She also suggests that much of the research about Asynchronous Learning Networks (ALNs) is less vigorous than it should be and therefore many of the findings are unfounded.

Does minimally-guided learning employ and enhance long-term memory or ignore it?

Fernette and Brock Eide: Medical students who learn through “case-based instruction” do better in practice but worse on tests.

Is it enough to do well in trials if you do poorly on tests?

Belshaw: “The space between the lessons and practice is where the learning is made permanent. If we don’t leave that space, new content keeps rushing in to overwrite the previous content, before the learner’s brain has a chance to pause, reflect, and synthesize the proteins needed for long-term memory storage.”

Do we and if so how do we leave space for learning between instruction?


Leemkuil: Drawing from Anderson, Reder and Simon, suggests “knowledges cannot be instructed by a teacher but rather it can only be constructed by the learner”

Is this the case? If so what is the role of a teacher? Using or previous metaphor of a teacher as a map maker, can teachers then lead learners to construct knowledge?


Nicholls: There is a compromise, students don’t have to be forced into rote memorization OR tossed out in the backyard to chase butterflies. It is possible to create “a rigorously framed and supported structure that relies on the elements in Vygotsy’s zone of proximal development to guide students through their learning”

Hiebert: References Wiley and Edwards paper on Online Self-organizing Social Systems (OSOSS), ie. blogs. They aren’t necessarily created to facilitate learning, but it does happen.

Is this an effective and efficient way to learn?


Questions:

Does making and disregarding connections on one’s own hinder or enhance learning?

Is this making mistakes only detrimental? Is there a way to avoid it?

Does minimally-guided learning employ and enhance long-term memory or ignore it?
Is it enough to do well in trials if you do poorly on tests?

Do we and if so how do we leave space for learning between instruction?

Is this the case? If so what is the role of a teacher? Using or previous metaphor of a teacher as a map maker, can teachers then lead learners to construct knowledge?

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